EBJ Proliance Surgeons (A.K.A Everett Bone & Joint)
A EBJ Proliance Surgeons patient in surgery recovery
 

Surgery Recovery

After surgery you will have a follow up appointment with your doctor usually within 10 to 14 days. During this visit your doctor will check your healing and answer any questions you may have.

When to Call the Doctor.

After surgery you will have a follow up appointment with your doctor usually within 10 to 14 days. During this visit your doctor will check your healing and answer any questions you may have.

In addition to your follow up appointment, call your doctor, nurse or the hospital emergency room if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Chest pain
  • Vomiting lasting longer than 4 hours
  • Large amount of swelling or bleeding
  • Smelly discharge from the incision
  • Red, hard, hot or painful area around the incision or your legs
  • Shortness of breath
  • No bowel movement within 3 days
  • Fever above 101°F

Caregivers

For the first day or two after surgery have someone available who can help you. They should know your medications and other instructions you were given.

Incision Care

You may leave the surgery center with a bandage or dressing which should be kept dry and clean. Your doctor will tell you when to remove it and when you can shower or bathe. Call your doctor if the bandage becomes soaked through.

Eating & Drinking

Your stomach may be upset and you may be constipated for a few days. This is often caused by the anesthesia or by certain pain medications. When you are ready to eat, start off with liquids, then move to solid foods. We recommend you initially avoid fatty, rich or spicy foods.

Drink at least 6 glasses of clear liquid such as water, apple juice, or ginger ale each day unless told otherwise. Try to avoid too many caffeinated beverages and alcohol

Activity

Post-surgical fitness and exercise is important for a full and speedy recovery. Talk to your doctor about what activities are good for you and any specific restrictions. You may be asked to do deep breathing and coughing exercises which help clear the lungs and improve blood flow. Do all activities as instructed and avoid those that cause pain at the surgical site.

Medication

  • Take your pain medication as prescribed for at least the first day as directed. Don’t wait until the pain is bad to take your medication.
  • It is best to take your pain medication with food, which can reduce the possibility of an upset stomach.
  • Pain medication can make you sleepy or dizzy.
  • Take only as much medication as your doctor prescribes. If you’re taking antibiotics, take them until the prescription is finished or your doctor tells you to stop.
  • If the medication does not relieve your pain, your pain worsens or you have severe side effects, call your doctor.

PDFs for Download

Surgery Center Forms:

EBJ Locations

 

For the first day or two after surgery have someone available who can help you.

 

Ask The Surgeon Shows

knee pain
 

Knee Pain in Middle-Aged Men

Middle-agers are the fifty something's whose knee joints are getting worn out. It's all those previous years of wear and tear on the knees that start to add up. From partial meniscus tears, to arthritic knees most the time the pain originated from an old knee injury or as a result of the life they have lived.

Shoulder Injuries
 

Shoulder Injuries

Ralph Haller, MD discusses labral tears seen in baseball players live at the Aquasox game.

Ankle Fractures
 

Types Of Ankle Fractures

In this segment of Ask The Surgeon, Dr Mason talks about ankle fractures and how impressed he is with the ankle joint and the tremendous amount of force it withstands over time versus its size.